Bhagavad Gita

Workplace Spirituality: Selflessness

Most humans would like to select a career that fulfills their passion and also pays well. But what if you have a dream that does not align with big earnings? Should you still follow your dreams? Or should you select the job that pays more? To find out, please read my new article in the Speaking Tree section of the Economic Times (Mar 18, 2020).

You can right click on the image below and select “View Image” to read the article.

Connecting to the source of happiness

Whenever we do something for God, our effort becomes a means of bringing us closer to God — the source of all happiness. In other words, we can gain happiness from our simplest efforts by offering them to God.

Efforts that convert to fame and money may have their importance in the real world but are considered perishables in spirituality. On the other hand, if we read a prayer to God or light a candle in front an image of God, it may bring more permanent results in terms of happiness. Why? Because God, who dwells in every heart and is the real witness of all our karma, gives the fruits of every action according to his own wish. If we have done something that should attract happiness, God will eventually give it to us.

Even career-conscious human beings can gain permanent happiness by forming a relationship with God. One approach of connecting to happiness on the workplace is by forming a harmony with karma yoga. To trigger this yoga, we have to make sure that we trust God. By remembering God at times and by surrendering our actions to God, we can remain unmoved by success and failure. As we move forward, we will see that our trust on God makes God’s grace the source of our happiness, not material success.

Knowledge from scriptures and self-realized individuals has its importance in guiding us towards happiness. In fact, scriptures supposedly provide us with viewpoints of human beings, generally saints, who have already realized God.  Because God may directly guide a human being towards himself through inspirations and other means, personal experiences are equally important in spirituality. Personal spiritual experiences can range from chanting a name of God and listening to discourses to having a face-to-face meeting with God (darshan), where applicable. In our professional endeavours or our spiritual journey, whenever in doubt, we can always request God to guide us rather than making concrete assumptions about how the universe works or what our favourite scripture actually says.

Mahatma Gandhi’s nonviolence: Agreement with the Bhagavad Gita

I would like to share my answer to a Quora question. The answer focuses on how Mahatma Gandhi’s nonviolence was in full agreement with the instruction given by Lord Krishna (to Arjuna) in the Bhagavad Gita. The full answer can be read on this page.

The Bhagavad Gita does not support violence but teaches human beings about (1) goodness as opposed to ignorance, (2) following dharma (this includes responsibilities and righteousness), and (3) the significance of surrendering to God with love. The Gita fully supports a comprehensive definition of ahimsa.

Mahatma Gandhi, a devotee of Lord Rama who had learned to surrender to Lord Rama (God), did what was inspired by God. For his circumstances (desh-kala-paristhiti; location-time-situation), God inspired him to follow a version of ahimsa that did not include war. Earlier, the same Lord, during his appearance on Earth as Lord Krishna, had instructed Arjuna to follow a version of ahimsa that included engagement in battle. Participation in a war, when it became inevitable (read about Krishna’s peace proposal here), was in line with Arjuna’s dharma.

While Arjuna had chosen to be a warrior by profession, Gandhi never made that choice. Gandhi’s dharma considerably differed from that of Arjuna. A single solution does not fit every situation. We should be happy that Gandhi’s path, which was highly spiritually advanced, worked, and Lord Rama blessed India with the results that they were looking for.

Happy Gandhi Jayanti!

[1] The Hindi verse shown in the image is from the Dohavali by Goswami Tulasidasa (published by Gita Press.) My English translation: “Lord Rama (God) is beyond knowledge and the senses; he is indescribable. He is unborn and transcends the mind, illusion, and nature. The Lord, whose attributes include Truth, Consciousness, and Bliss, has performed illustrious divine plays on Earth as a human being.” This translation was originally published at this site.

[2] Readers can also read about Gandhi’s karma yoga in this blog post. If you are new to Hindu spirituality, you can check out this blog post for an introduction to Lord Rama.

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